Tag Archives: polarization

Enumerati

Parties Polarized on Impeachment, Removal

89%

A new Gallup poll finds 89% of Democrats currently say President Trump should be impeached and removed from office. That compares with 71% of Democrats who in 1974 said the charges against Nixon warranted his removal from office. Among Republicans, 92% reject Trump being impeached and removed from office while just 7% are in favor of it. Under Nixon, a smaller 59% of his fellow Republicans opposed his removal from office while 31% endorsed it.

Enumerati

Political Book Sales Mirror a Divided Country

57%

Data published by book store chain Barnes & Noble show a 57% boost in political book sales compared to the prior year, CNBC reports. But with a few exceptions, states that voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election tended to also favor the books that cast him in a friendlier light, and vice versa.

Verbatim

No Middle Ground in 2016

If the Republicans win the presidency in 2016, they will also almost inevitably control both the Senate and the House of Representatives, giving them virtually unfettered command over the entire federal government to go along with their domination of the great majority of the state governments. The Republican president could easily be in a position to appoint new justices to the Supreme Court for an unstoppable right-wing majority that would last for a generation to come. … If, however, the Democrats win the presidency in 2016, they will almost certainly take back the Senate and make gains in the House – and the Democratic president will likely be able to appoint new justices to the Supreme Court that will eventually comprise a liberal majority. Between these two stark alternatives, there is no middle ground. In 2016, the country will become either one thing or the other.

— Sean Wilentz, in Rolling Stone

Verbatim

Let’s Restart the Cycle of Hope and Disappointment

At election time, candidates seduce us with promises to bring America together, but inevitably fall short and end up leaving office with the country more polarized than when they arrived. After blaming them for their failure to unite us, we turn to the next crop of presidential aspirants and the cycle of hope and disappointment begins all over again.

— Brendan Nyhan, writing for the New York Times’ The Upshot blog.