Mississippi Abortion Ban to Create More Dead Infants, Mothers

5,000

Associated Press: “In Mississippi, where health officials expect 5,000 more births each year as a result of the Supreme Court ruling upending abortion rights, children are more likely to die before their first birthday than in any other state. … Mississippi has the nation’s highest fetal mortality rate, highest infant mortality rate, highest pre-term birth rate and is in the top decile of states in maternal mortality. Black mothers are nearly three times more likely to die due to childbirth than Mississippi’s white women.”

Abortions Are Now Not Available in 14 States

125,780

Politico: “As of Wednesday, abortions are almost entirely unavailable in 14 states — Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and Wisconsin. And access is significantly limited in a 15th state, Georgia, where the procedure is allowed until the detection of fetal cardiac activity, which usually happens around six weeks of pregnancy.” … “The 14 states were responsible for 125,780 abortions in 2020… And 41,620 abortions were performed in Georgia the same year.”

Mo. Lawmaker Proposes Gun Laws Similar to Abortion Laws

Since Missouri holds the rank as one of the strictest abortion regulation states in the country, it is logical we borrow similar restrictions to lower our horrific gun violence rates.

— Missouri state Rep. Stacey Newman (D), introducing a bill to apply “the restrictions placed on women seeking abortion services to all prospective firearm purchasers, such as a requirement that anyone buying a gun first watch a 30-minute video on fatal firearm injuries,” St. Louis Magazine reports.

States Increasingly Inacting Abortion Restrictions

51

Number of new abortion restrictions states have enacted so far this year, according to a new study by the Guttmacher Institute. “This brings the number of restrictions enacted since 2010 to 282. Although only about a dozen states remain in session as of July 1, these states may well enact additional restrictions before the end of the year. Following the recent pattern of increased restrictions in odd-numbered years (largely because not all legislatures are in session in even-numbered years), states have enacted more restrictions during the first half of this year than during all of last year.”